Why I Wrote Wise Mind Living

Today is an exciting day for me: my first book, Wise Mind Living: Master Your Emotions, Transform Your Life, has officially launched.

I wrote this book because I believe most people have the wrong idea about what stress is, which is why they aren’t very good at managing it.

What we need to do is learn how to manage our distressing emotions—because that’s what stress really is.

Wise Mind Living is an owner’s manual to your emotions. As a clinical psychologist with 19-years experience treating patients, I realized that most people have no idea how to identify or label their emotions. I also know that not every problem requires therapy.

The reason we all need to learn about emotions is because our stress and the related problems it causes all stem from emotions that are being ignored, denied, misunderstood or just poorly handled.

Your distressing emotions, when they aren’t taken care of in a productive way, are at the root of all of your most common issues: overeating, chronic relationship conflict, money mismanagement, substance abuse, and in many cases, poor physical health.

In Wise Mind Living, I’ll teach you to identify and manage the emotions that might be getting in the way of achieving your goals. We’ll use mindfulness exercises and lifestyle strategies to help change the way you think, feel, and behave in situations where stress or difficult emotions like anxiety, sadness, anger or shame arise.

At the end of the book I offer a six-week Wise Mind Living program for practicing the strategies you’ve learned. Keep in mind that it will take ongoing practice to properly hone your new skills. But when you’re able to get a handle on your emotions, you can get a handle on your problems—and your stress.

I also recorded an audio program titled, Living in Wise Mind: Practices to Master Your Emotions and Transform Your Life, intended as a stand-alone resource or as a complement to my book.

Living in Wise Mind brings you an empowering series of guided mindfulness meditation exercises, on-the-spot techniques for managing distressing situations, and training in how to accept and tolerate the things we can’t change.

Wise Mind Living is a continual balancing act between acceptance and change, and it gets easier to maintain with practice. I hope my book and CDs help you along your journey. It’s never too late to change and transform your life!

Mindfully,

Erin

 

 

2018-03-22T02:55:40+00:00 By |Wise Mind Living|3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Anonymous January 18, 2015 at 4:22 pm

    Dr. Olivo, I recently heard you speak about Emotional Literacy on the Insights at the Edge podcast with Tami Simon and I loved what you had to say. It all made a lot of sense and I think that the points you made have armed me with a tool set to deal with my own emotions–which is the reason I wanted to reach out to you. In the podcast, you talked about the evolutionary need for emotions like love, empathy, jealousy and anger among others. I’m wondering if loneliness has an evolutionary reason for being. Apart for the obvious needing and wanting to be in a tribe as it would have probably meant more protection for the individual, what can a prevailing source of loneliness teach, if anything at all? I find myself battling loneliness and while in it, I turn into introspection asking myself why it is that I feel this emotion. I’d like to think that the search for this answer can be fruitful I just don’t know how yet.

  2. Erin Olivo March 4, 2015 at 5:25 pm

    I think you are exactly right about the evolutionary purpose of loneliness. When we feel it, it can be a motivator for seeking out connection and bring us closer to a protective “tribe.” The downside of the emotion though is that sometimes it can feel so overwhelming that we have a hard time pushing past it to seek out those connections. I would encourage you to see if you can view your loneliness as a signal from your body that its time to get active and get out and interact. Try to find something that will be fun or meaningful for you to do with or without another person and that way you’ll get the benefit either way! If you can’t think of what to try perhaps you can find a local hospital or shelter where you can volunteer your time. Thanks so much for your open-ness in sharing your comment. So many people struggle with loneliness and I am sure it will be helpful for others to see they aren’t alone it.
    I wish you all the best.
    Mindfully,
    Erin

Leave A Comment